Tuesday, January 19, 2016

3 2 1 Exit Tickets

Hello everyone! It's Greg from Mr Elementary Math.  We all know how important it is to know where our students are, but what can we do to help us figure that out?  One strategy that I like to use to determine student understanding are 3-2-1 Exit Tickets.  They are easy to use and can be very informative.






What Are 3-2-1 Exit Tickets?


3-2-1 exit tickets are a way for students to summarize and reflect on a lesson.  I found that it is a quick and effective tool because it provides feedback on what kids have learned and allows you to see questions that they may have about the concept or skill. 

The students write:
 3 - Things that they learned from the lesson
 2 - Questions that still have
 1 - Idea or thought that stuck with them


How Does This Look in the Classroom?

After you finish your lesson, give students an opportunity to review and reflect on their learning by having them record their thinking on the 3-2-1 exit ticket. 

This activity can be completed independently, in pairs/groups or as a whole class. Early grades teachers may allow students to discuss the ideas with a classroom partner and then verbally share with the class.  After the students share with a buddy, the teacher should record student responses on chart paper or the board.


If you choose to try it out, I would love to hear how it went in your classroom!






2 comments:

  1. Hi Greg, Thanks so much for sharing your form. Although I teach High School mathematics, I use a variety of Exit tickets, included the tried and true, 3-2-1. To keep the process from getting stale with my students, I vary what the "3" "2" and "1" represent. For instance, Name 3 new things you learned, 2 things you still want to know (or found interesting) and 1 thing you'd like us to explore further. Just as you said, I learn a great deal from my students' answers while also giving me an authentic, kid-generated starting place for the next lesson.

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    1. Thanks for your comment. You are correct! There are so many ways to use the "3-2-1". It is very versatile. And the best part is you get a window into what your students are thinking.

      Greg

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